Subject Line Of An Email Cover Letter

With hundreds of resumes sent for a single opening, you want to stand out from the crowd. Emailing your resume to a recruiter or hiring manager is one of the most effective ways to land an interview.

Since this is the first contact you’ll have with your potential employer you want to ensure it’s done right. With hiring managers and recruiters receiving tons of resumes through email, the subject line could be the difference between getting your email opened or deleted.

Studies have also found that33% of email recipients decide whether or not they’ll open an email based on the subject line.

Not to worry, we’ve got you covered! We’ll show you how to write the perfect subject lines when emailing your resume as well as some good examples.

How to write the perfect subject line when sending your resume

Keep it Short and Simple

Remember that brevity is important when writing your subject line. Most of the text in the subject line gets cut off so ensure the first few words capture attention.

Hubspot recommends keeping the subject line under 50 characters so that when scanning emails, the receiver pretty much knows what the email is about. It’s okay to go over this a bit but ensure you get the important details in the first few words.

You also shouldn’t put anything in the subject line that sounds like a marketing email. Avoid soft skill phrases like dedicated or passionate. This is a major turnoff for hiring managers and will likely get your email in the trash folder.

You should also always be direct and never leave the hiring manager to wonder what the email is about. If you’re following up on an interview or job application, state it directly. For example:

“Following up on the accounting position – John Doe”

“Following up on the interview – Tom Nash”

You can read more on following up on aresume submission here.

Check for instructions

You should always check the job posting for instructions regarding submitting an application. Sometimes you’ll find clear instructions on what they want in the subject line. For example, if they simply ask for the position, Job ID # and your name, you would simply write:

“ Marketing manager, Job ID # 2283, John Doe”

Don’t add anything else if instructions have been provided.

Referral name

Did someone in the company refer you? If so, this is possibly the best way to capture the attention of a hiring manager. Ensure you use the name of the person who referred you in the subject line. Here is a job referral subject line example:

“Referral from Tom Nash: John Doe, candidate for senior accounting position”

Most positions filled today come through some sort of referral as there is already a trust factor established when an employee, or someone associated with the company refers you. Hiring managers love referrals so be sure to mention their name and “referral” in the first few words of the email subject.

What to include in the subject line

If #2 or #3 above don’t really apply to you, this is what you should include in the subject line for the standard job search email.

  • “Job application”
  • Job title
  • Job Id (If there is one)
  • Your name

Example:

“Job application – Accountant, Job Id #4453 – John Doe”

If you’re just sending your resume without applying for a specific position, you can just write:

“Marketing manager resume, Tom Nash”

Major Qualifications/Certifications

If there are certifications or major qualifications you possess you should include it. If the position requires a CPA certification, list it after your name. This could really help you stand out to the hiring manager. For example:

“Job application – Accountant, Job Id #4453 – John Doe, CPA”

Professional email

Not having a professional email is one of the worst mistakes you can make as a job seeker. Hiring managers and recruiters will usually reject an email if it sounds unprofessional. Emails like “Knicksfan11” or “MichaelB229283” will not be taken seriously.

Your email should be a combination of your name or your name and the job title you’re after. Having a few numbers in your email is fine but try to keep it short and professional. Here are examples of acceptable emails:

  • Tomshulz01
  • TomAccountant
  • BridgetRN

Snagajob has a good article about the importance of having aprofessional email.

There is no excuse for this as there are tons of email combinations you can use which are acceptable.

The tips above should help you craft the perfect email subject when submitting a job application or following up. Always cut straight to the point and leave out the fluff. Using tricks and keywords that hook someone into opening an email will not work with hiring managers and recruiters.

Remember that once you capture the attention of the employer, you want to have a solid resume that clearly and effectively portrays why you’re a good fit for the position.

ZipJob uses professional writers and technology to get your resume noticed. You can get aFree resume review here.

8 tips for better email cover letters

If you're emailing a resume, your cover letter will deliver the first impression. These eight tips will help you craft a better email cover letter.

Follow these tips for emailing a cover letter that will get you noticed.

As the saying goes, you don't get a second chance to make a first impression. If you're doing a job search or resume submission via email, the first impression any employer will have is from your cover letter.

When you're asked to email your job application to a company, you can either copy and paste your cover letter into the body of your email, or you can attach it as a file, along with your resume. If you send your cover letter as an attachment, you can send it as either a PDF file or Word document. Here's what else you should you consider when crafting an email cover letter.

How should a cover letter look?

Some tips for writing a cover letter are standard, whether you're e-mailing or snail mailing: Be professional, with correct spelling and grammar, and—very important—do use them. (Here are some cover letter samples if you'd like to get a visual idea.) Other tips pertain only to the electronic medium, and when disregarded, could ruin your chances before your foot is in the door.

Don't waste your subject line

What you write in the subject line can determine whether your letter gets read, according to Lydia Ramsey, business etiquette expert and author of Manners That Sell. "Don't ever leave the subject line of your email blank, and don't waste it by just inserting the job number," Ramsey says. "The subject line should be clear and specific to the job you're looking for." An example: "Bilingual CPA seeks account manager position."

Use standard cover letter protocol

Write your letter as the body of the email and include a salutation (use the receiver's actual name if you know it) and a standard closing. ("Sincerely" or "Warm regards" work well.) Leave blank lines between paragraphs, and use appropriate signature and closing lines.

Include all the information in your signature line you would have on your business card, including snail mail address, phone number and email address. "Remember, your email address doesn't always automatically show up on the receiver's email program," Ramsey says.

Keep it short and dynamic

Managers and recruiters are busy. They want to get the gist of your pitch in 150 words or fewer. The first paragraph is crucial, according to Ramsey. "Hook the reader in the first paragraph by selling him or her your abilities," she says. "Use short paragraphs and short sentences to give a very brief bio on who you are and what you can do for them, and wrap it up in the second paragraph."

Keep it simple

If you write a cover letter in a word-processing program, strip away all formatting and save the file as plain text. The ideal line length is 40 characters. Some email packages automatically do word wrap for you, so your cover letter doesn't arrive in fragments.

Don't get cute. Save emoticons, abbreviations, and wild colors and fonts for your nonprofessional emails. The same goes for humor. Chances are, the reader won't think it's funny, and may even find it irritating.

Be specific

Don't respond to an ad for a copywriter when you're really a graphic designer, says Diana Qasabian, talent director at Syndicatebleu. "It may be the tight job market, but we've been receiving more and more letters responding to a specific job from candidates who are not at all qualified for it," she says.

"We look for specifics in email cover letters, which means skills and abilities," she adds. "Embellishment and fluff are not necessary. It's not necessary to write, 'I'm a hard worker.' That goes without saying."

Keywords are key

Because many companies use applicant tracking systems (ATSes) to find and screen candidates, skill-oriented keywords will boost your chance at being discovered, a recruiter at a large technology company says.

"ATS tools track keywords that identify skill sets," she says. "So even if you're not right for the job you're seeking, strong keywords improve the chance that your cover letter and resume will be retrieved in a future search or be selected for a more appropriate job."

Play by their rules

Take the time to learn the company guidelines for submitting resumes, and follow them. Many companies list these guidelines on their Web sites. Also, don't include attachments unless they are requested. Some companies block all emails with attachments to prevent viruses.

Check it again

Thoroughly spell-check and proofread your email letter. And remember, your email software's spell-checker won't catch grammar mistakes. Send it to a friend first and ask him to check it for content and style. If all your friends are tapped out, or even if they aren't, test your email cover letter by emailing it to yourself, and put yourself in the mindset of an employer when you read it.

Get recruiters' attention

Once your cover letter is polished and ready to go, make sure you get maximum use from it. After all, it'll do you no good just sitting on your computer. You need to get your cover letter in front of the people who are doing the hiring. Could you use some help getting their attention? Join Monster today. As a member, you can upload up to five resumes and cover letters—each tailored to the different kinds of jobs that interest you. Recruiters search Monster every day looking to fill top jobs with qualified candidates, just like you. 


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