Essay King Tut

King Tut Funerary Mask Essay

The funerary mask of Egyptian pharaoh Tutankhamun, also dubbed by many as "King Tut," is considered one of the most familiar artifacts from Egypt's 18th Dynasty. Weighing in at approximately 24 pounds and measuring 21 inches in height and 15 inches wide, the mask was placed on the mummy of Tutankhamun upon his death in 1352 B.C. and remained undiscovered for centuries. Made primarily from solid gold, the mask was also inlaid with cornelian, obsidian, lapis lazuli, turquoise, quartz, and colored glass. Upon inspecting the backside of the mask, one can see that it had been inscribed with a series of spells and texts from the Egyptian Book of the Dead, of which were intended to protect the mask from all harm. The mask along with hundreds of priceless artifacts discovered in the tomb of the king are now housed in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo, Egypt.

The Ancient Egyptians were firm believers in life after death, so much so that they strived to preserve the bodies of the recently deceased. This rather long process of embalming the dead, called mummification, was believed to help lost souls recognize and reunite with their bodies upon a proper burial. Primarily a practice reserved for kings and pharaohs, the mummies were buried in lavish pyramids or tombs along with their riches, furnishings, and other prized possessions to take with them to the afterlife. When the young Egyptian pharaoh Tutankhamun died at the of 19 after ruling for a decade's time, the well recognized mask of today was used as a means to ensure the spirit of the king would be able to recognize his body.

Tutankhamun's golden funerary mask portrays the late Egyptian pharaoh wearing a royal headdress, also known as a "nemes." The stripes depicted on the headdress "are made of blue glass in imitation of lapis lazuli, and the same material has been used for the inlay of the plaited false beard (The Tutankhamun Exhibit)." Atop the forehead of the mask displays the vulture and the cobra, both of which consist primarily of solid gold along with other materials such as carnelian, faience, lapis lazuli, colored glass, and quartz. Also known as uraeus, the rearing cobra symbolizes Lower Egypt and serves the purpose of protecting Tutankhamun through the means of spitting fire at approaching enemies of the pharaoh in the afterlife. The vulture, on the other hand, symbolizes Upper Egypt and is considered to be the creature nearest to God who resides above us all. Both pieces were beautifully crafted and well suited for protecting the pharaoh from harm throughout his journey into the...

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The Mystery of King Tut's Death

The Mystery of King Tut's Death

If you ask the average American to name an egyptian king ninety nine percent of the time they will spout out the name king Tutankhamun or king Tut for short with out really even thinking about it. Why is that so many automatically associate an egyptian casket with the one that was unearthed in Tut's tomb? Maybe it has something to do with the kings appointment at such a young age and the mysterious circumstances surrounding his death or murder at the tender age of eighteen. Maybe it has something to do with the highly publicized discovery of the tomb of Tutankhamun. Tutankhamun's is the only royal tomb in Egypt to have escaped the…show more content…

"The evidence that we have would probably not convict Aye in a modern court of law, but I think it is the best theory of what happened ”(Maugh, 1997). This theory makes a lot of sense and fits the mold of a typical happening in the higher echelons of power. Many times kings are assassinated because someone close to them is envious of their title or status and whets it for himself. The envious person knows that the only way that they can attain their life's ambitions is to get rid of the one standing in their way so they turn to murderous ways and deceitful schemes to get what they want.

Another theory about the death of king Tut is that he died from an unfortunate illness that he was stricken with. This has been studied throughout the years and has even been linked to a broken leg that the remains of king Tut show evidence of. According to Hutan Ashrafian, a surgeon at Imperial College London, Tut suffered from a hereditary form of epilepsy. Ashrafian said of Tut's supposed feminine features the king has been depicted in statues and renderings as having had breasts and wide hips are signs that he had a form of epilepsy that affects the temporal lobe, which is known to be involved with hormone release. The disease might be to blame for Tut's death in addition to the deaths of several of his predecessors who died at young ages, Ashrafian claims (Bindley, 2012).

This theory also makes a lot of sense due to the

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